Total mercury analyzer – simply explained

New product video illustrates the functionality of the HM-1400 TRX 2


In the coming years, new regional mercury regulations will come into force due to changes in European legislation. Continuous mercury measurement will therefore become mandatory for many industrial plants. This offers great opportunities for the HM-1400 TRX 2 total mercury analyser from DURAG. At the same time, it raises the question of how best to convince the market of the complex technology behind it.

One answer to this question is a new animated product video that illustrates the functionality of the HM-1400 TRX 2 in just over three minutes:

More information about the instrument can be found here: www.durag.com/products-en/measuring-monitoring-en/mercury-analyzers-en/hm-1400-trx-en

Limit values and measurements become necessary due to the considerable air pollution by mercury. Global mercury emissions to air are currently estimated at a total of 2,300 tonnes per year. Anthropogenic sources of mercury emissions account for about 50% of the total amount of mercury released into the atmosphere each year. The main industrial sources of anthropogenic mercury are coal combustion, mining, industrial activities that process ores into various metals or other raw materials into cement.

To protect human health and the environment from anthropogenic emissions and releases of mercury, the so-called Minamata Convention was adopted in 2013 and has since been signed and ratified by more than 200 countries. In order to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial facilities, emission limits exist in many countries.

In order to ensure compliance with these limit values, continuous measurements of mercury in flue gases must be carried out. These pose a number of challenges to the measurement systems. On the one hand, the mercury concentrations in the flue gas are 1,000 to 100,000 times lower than for other flue gas components. The challenge is to monitor mercury in the range of µg (ppb) with high accuracy. On the other hand, mercury emissions occur as a mixture of elemental mercury (Hg0) and inorganic oxidised mercury (Hgn+). All available measurement principles are based on the measurement of elemental mercury. Therefore, before analysing the mercury concentration, it is necessary to convert oxidised mercury into elemental mercury.

All available mercury analysers are extractive systems, i.e. the flue gas is extracted by means of a sampling system and then transported to the analyser via a heated sample line. A constant heating of the sampling system is important for sampling, as oxidised mercury is absorbed on cold surfaces. After extraction of the gas, oxidised mercury is converted into elemental mercury. The elemental mercury is analysed with an optical measuring principle in the UV wavelength range (e.g. atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic fluorescence spectroscopy or differential optical absorption spectroscopy).


Your contact options

Email

Contact

Sales

Sales

Service

Service

LinkedIn

LinkedIn

Xing

Xing

Facebook

Facebook